The usage of 360°-content…
Mai 15, 2018 — 14:00

within social media communication in soccer sports

Talk at the 18th Annual International Conference on Sports: Economic, Management, Marketing & Social Aspects at Athens, Greece on May 15th 2018

Abstract:

360 degree photo and video represents a substantial innovation in visual communication in sports (Hebbel-Seeger, 2017). Within the digital transformation the technological development in the field of audiovisual media first of all to improve the image quality and usability as well as the expansion of possible application areas, conditioned by compact and waterproof devices (like „action cams“) (Petrović et al., 2015). In addition, decreasing acquisition costs lead to a wider use. The depiction of a complex happening in all directions as a 360 degree photo or video, however, offers completely new communicative possibilities with a high immersive potential (Ting, 2015).

We investigated whether and how 360 degree photo and video is currently used in social media communication in soccer. For this purpose, we analyzed the social media activities of three top clubs each in the English “Premiere League”, the German “Erste Bundesliga” and the Spanish “Primera División” over the period of the last 3 weeks of the season 2016/2017 by means of a content analysis. As a reference, we have also looked on the US “Major League Soccer”. In a next step, we have conducted interviews with communication experts in the field of sports regarding the potential and future prospects of 360 photo and video in sports communication. It shows that the communicative potential is seen and high expectations are placed on the technology. At the same time, however, it is above all a lack of human resources and a lack of experience in the conception and use of 360-degree photo and video content that currently stand in the way of a common use.

Within this contribution the technology will be outlined, actual current uses in the context of social media communication in soccer highlighted and expectations and future mission ideas outlined.

References:

Hebbel-Seeger, A. (2017). 360 Degrees Video and VR for Training and Marketing within Sports. Athens Journal of Sports 4, 4, 243-261

Ting, L. (2015). Application of Virtual Reality Technology to Sports. In E.E. Elatar & S.-B. Tsai (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2015 AASRI International Conference on Circuits and Systems (p. 311-313). Paris, Amsterdam & Hong Kong: Atlantis.

Petrović, L.T., Milovanović, D. & Desbordes, M. (2015). Emerging technologies and sports events: Innovative information and communication solutions. Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, 5, 2, 175-190.

 

From Seeing to Beeing?! …
April 27, 2018 — 22:00

The feeling of presence within 360-degrees video in sports communication

Talk at the IACS summit at Indiana University, Bloomington/USA on April 27th 2018

Abstract:

While the use of VR environments in the context of motor learning and training has been systematically worked on since the second half of the 1990s, especially in the area of „Serious Games“ (e.g. Prensky, 2001, Wiemeyer, 2002, Hebbel-Seeger, 2013 ), new options are emerging with 360-degree video technology and VR eyewear. For the use of these technologies, sports offers not only a wide range of potential usage scenarios. The close connection between 360-degree video and VR glasses and the latest consumer technology in the field of mobile devices is forcing a rapid spread and thus also increasing the technology’s importance within sports.

In addition to the novelty the „presence“ aspect, the feeling of „really“ being somewhere else instead of the environment where someone is physically located (e.g. Singer & Witmer, 1998, S. 225), is currently the main argument for the use of 360-degree video and VR glasses as a projection medium (e.g. Hebbel-Seeger, 2017). On the technological side an important basis for the quality of a presence experience is „immersion“ (Slater & Wilbur, 1997): the stronger technology supports the presence of the user into a virtual environment, the closer the user believes themselves to be to the visualized situation (e.g. Ramalho & Chambel, 2013). Despite the still present technical limitations of the devices, the advantages of head mounted displays (HMD) or VR glasses for 360-degree video content over screen presentations are becoming clear as the former allow for closing off from the outside world, a low-threshold access by employing everyday technology as well as native (sensitive to movement) navigation in space. Even if there is no additional “interaction” with the medium beyond the manipulation of the image section possible and there is “only” the possibility of grasping the events from the perspective of a camera in a fixed position in a given course of action, consumers of 360-degree videos may still have a strong experience of presence as long as the content engages the attention of the user and results in great “involvement” (Singer & Witmer, 1998, p. 227). Depending on individual interests and previously made experiences, a media based spatial adaption may happen in various ways despite employing one and the same 360-degree video and subsequently become an individualized world of experience.

In various studies we have investigated if and how the use of 360-degree video in combination with VR-glasses has an impact on emotional, affective and physiological aspects. In terms of sporting training as well as marketing contexts, our key questions were what influence do immersion and presence experience have on the communication success, what is the role of the projection medium and how to achieve storytelling within 360-degrees video? In this contribution I will briefly share general usage experiences and discuss selected findings.

References:

Hebbel-Seeger, A. (2013). Pedagogical and Psychological Impacts of Teaching and Learning in Virtual Realities. In A. Hebbel-Seeger, T. Reiners, T. & D. Schäffer (Eds.), Synthetic Worlds – Emerging Technologies in Education and Economics (S. 233-249). New York: Springer.

Hebbel-Seeger, A. (2017). Innovative Videoformate im Sport. Markenkommunikation mit 360-Grad und VR. In J. Förster, A. Hebbel-Seeger, T. Horky & H.-J. Schulke (Eds.), Sport und Stadtentwicklung (p. 316-346). Aachen: Meyer & Meyer.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital-game-based learning. New York and London: McGraw Hill.

Ramalho, J. & Chambel, T. (2013). Immersive 360° Mobile Video with an Emotional Perspective. Proceedings of ImmersiveMe 2013 (S. 35-40). Bacelona/Spain: ACM.

Singer, M.J. & Witmer, B.G. (1998). Measuring Presence in Virtual Environments: A Presence Questionnaire. Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 7, 3, 225-240.

Slater, M., & Wilbur, S. (1997). A framework for immersive virtual environments (FIVE): Speculations on the role of presence in virtual environments. Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 6, 6, 603–616.

Wiemeyer, J. (2002). Multimedia im Sport. In H. Altenberger (Ed.), Medien im Sport (p.123 – 153). Schorndorf: Hofmann.

 

360 Degrees Video and VR for Training and Marketing within Sports
Mai 8, 2017 — 7:30

Talk at the 17 th Annual International Conference on Sports: Economic, Management, Marketing & Social Aspects (Panel „Digitalization in Sports“), 8-11 May 2017, Athens, Greece

Abstract

While the use of VR environments in the context of motor learning and training has been systematically worked on since the second half of the 1990s, especially in the area of „Serious Games“ (e.g. Prensky, 2001, Wiemeyer, 2002, Hebbel-Seeger, 2013 ), new options are emerging with 360-degree video technology and VR eyewear. For the use of these technologies sports offers not only a wide range of potential usage scenarios. The close connection between 360-degree video and VR glasses and the latest consumer technology in the field of mobile devices is forcing a rapid spread and thus also increasing the technology’s importance within sports.
In addition to the novelty the „immersion“ aspect is currently the main argument for the use of 360-degree video and VR glasses as a projection medium (see Hebbel-Seeger, i.p.). In various studies we have investigated if and how the use of 360-degree video in combination with VR-glasses has an impact on emotional, affective and physiological aspects. In this contribution I will briefly present the technology, share general usage experiences and finally discuss selected findings.

Sources

  • Hebbel-Seeger, A. (2013). Pedagogical and Psychological Impacts of Teaching and Learning in Virtual Realities. In A. Hebbel-Seeger, T. Reiners, T. & D. Schäffer (Hrsg.), Synthetic Worlds – Emerging Technologies in Education and Economics (S. 233-249). New York: Springer.
  • Hebbel-Seeger, A. (i.p.). Markenkommunikation in Erlebniswelten. Die Nutzung innovativer Medienformate zur Inszenierung von Sport im Raum. In J. Förster, A. Hebbel-Seeger, T. Horky & H.-J. Schulke (Eds.), Sport und Stadtentwicklung. Aachen: Meyer & Meyer.
  • Prensky, M. (2001). Digital-game-based learning. New York and London: McGraw Hill.
  • Wiemeyer, J. (2002). Multimedia im Sport. In H. Altenberger (Ed.), Medien im Sport (p.123 – 153). Schorndorf: Hofmann.